Storytelling Art: My Time Writing With an iPad Pro (In-Depth Review)

Storytelling Art is a series about the kinds of storytelling methods I use and what kinds of material I use to make them. I also talk about my life as an author and what goes into my day to day life. Today, we’re talking about my time with the 10.5 inch iPad Pro.

 

IPad plus writing

Yeah…That’s about the best I can do with my finger.

 

Storytelling Art: My Time Writing With an iPad Pro (In-Depth Review)

 

So last week, I mentioned that I bought an iPad Pro for my writing and now that I had a little more time to play with it, I felt that it would be a better idea to do a more in-depth review of it. I’ll talk mainly about how I use it for writing rather than a tech-based review. So let me share my thoughts.

Overall Design

I guess if we start anywhere, it would have to be the screen itself. It’s just the right size. I probably could have justified the 12.9 inch, but I felt that was too big for what it was trying to be. My old iPad (Original third gen, complete with the fat plug instead of the lightning port), would have been fine, but this feels just right. The words are large enough and I can move my keys pretty easily. The sound quality is great for YouTube and Twitch streams and the UI on iOS 11 is super convenient as well, which I’ll get to later. I really like how this thing looks and feels overall and it might be the best tablet I’ve used (granted, I’ve always used apple stuff for mobile devices). I love the design overall

 

How is it typing?

Typing is passable. It’s no different than when I type on my computer, but the portability is a nice touch. Once again, I’m typing this blog post on my iPad Pro and I have autocorrect off (my PC doesn’t have it, so why should this thing?). One quirk which I’ll get to in a bit is I have to stretch my pinky out so it doesn’t touch the screen. I feel it might be a little too close to the keyboard. The typing is good overall. It’s what I expect out of a thing like this.

 

 

File_001

Scrivener and iBooks open at once

 

Multitasking Epicness

The multitasking functionality is excellent and I’ll use this during the structural editing phase. I’m even considering using this as a second screen for my writing thesauri. The drag and drop split screen is a godsend for my work and really makes writing a breeze. Right now, I have both Google Docs (what I use to write blog posts) and the Negative Trait Thesaurus (an example I can use to showcase typing while having two things open at once). I can focus on one thing while working on another. I’ve mentioned before how I don’t have the pencil for this, which I’ll get down the line. But aside from that, I love the multitasking.

I can have two apps open at once, and sometimes three if I let something hand in the window. And the dock makes switching between apps super easy. I can go from writing my stories to working on my blog post to reading in a snap. It’s super easy.

 

Downsides?

I guess there are some downsides to talk about. While I love this thing, I can see some of its issues clearly. First, is that when I type, sometimes I touch the screen and write in a different spot in the process. It’s really annoying and distracts me from what I was doing before to fix all of it. I have to shift my pinky away from the screen so I can type without making errors.

The back button is another issue for me. It doesn’t speed up like it does when you hold it down for too long. On my phone at least, it speeds up when I hold down, but not here. Which means for deleting long sentences, it takes a while.

Those are my only downside so far. The battery life is pretty stellar. I’ve only had to charge it twice since I got it, and that was about a week ago. As far as I’m concerned this is a good device overall.

 

 

DualEditingSetup

A dual-screen set up, while a little hard to find at first, is invaluable in the editing phase.

 

 

Can it replace a laptop?

I’ve said a while back when I first started that this might not be a replacement for a laptop. Well, I’m actually taking that back…kind of.

As far as just writing and editing, I’d say sure, this is perfect. I can’t do a double screen like I can with scrivener, but if I can import everything to Google Docs and use that, it can work just as well. I just have to transfer everything. If I use the Quick Reference Feature (Simply swipe a document in the binder to the right and select quick reference), I can have the same dual screen setup I use on the PC. As far as a pure writing tool, you can easily get by with just this. It’ll set you back about 800 dollars, but I think for the price, it’s well worth it.

Has it replaced MY laptop? I’m honestly not sure. I will use it for light gaming and the more manual drafts, but there are other uses, especially for submitting works to publishers. I’ll still use a laptop or a PC for that. Or if I want to browse the internet or play a game in another room.

 

Final thoughts

I have to hand it to Apple. They know how to make a super futuristic device here. It’s clearly the definitive tablet/PC and I’d recommend it to anyone who’s deeply interested in being a writer who wants to have a good go-to writing device. It’s super easy to carry, too, which is a major bonus instead of lugging a heavy laptop around like mine.

So that’s all I have to say. Overall, I’ll stick with this for now and maybe I’ll post follow up to see if I truly replace my laptop permanently. Only time will tell.

 


That’s all for today. Take care, and remember, the inn is always open.

About Steven Capobianco

Steven Capobianco spends his free time imagining himself as a heroic swordsman vigilante. When he's not daydreaming fantastic adventures, he is a Long Island native who spends his time playing video games and watching anime. He has spent a majority of his writing life making fan fiction. He writes middle-grade and sometimes Young Adult fiction about the imaginative journeys to distant lands and realities. His first short story, Do Not Stare Into The Eyes of a Kitsune, goes on sale June 2018.
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